Flying Dog

Having an active dog can be exhausting. It doesn’t help that I strained a muscle in my foot last month, so I haven’t been taking him out for walks as much as he would like. So what to do to exercise the dog?

How about seeing if he can catch a cup of water?

Ready?!


Jump!


And here’s the landing. You can see how he’s been tearing up the lawn.


Again?


Makes my foot hurt just to watch him land.


Take a picture, Dada!

… and we’re back for more infrequent blog posts!   

Mr. C loves our smartphones, with all their features, apps, and games.  One thing he likes to do is direct me in how and when to use the camera. My camera’s memory is filled with pictures he wanted to take. He especially likes to take pictures of clouds and sunsets. Here’s a few.  These were taken in Vermont, New Hampshire, Texas, Colorado, and New Mexico.






WPC: Spring

This week’s photo challenge is ‘Spring’, and as usual, I’m late posting!

Spring in Southern New England is the brief time in between turning off the furnace and turning on the air conditioner. It usually lasts about two weeks. Once it’s over, we go into hazy, hot, and humid New England Summer. These brief weeks tend to be rainy, cloudy, and cold, with a few bright sunny days mixed in. So we try to get as much gardening done as possible now to take advantage of all the rain.

I tend to be a very unorganized gardener, which will be apparent as I describe these photos.

A month or so ago, I posted a photo of some vegetable seeds we had started; basil, dill, a few varieties of tomato, Swiss chard, and a few others. Though which tomato variety is which, I now have no idea. I’ve been trying to take them out for a few hours each day to harden them before transplanting, though most days have been too rainy and windy to do that. Maybe I’ll be able to transplant in a week or so.

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Here are a few Iris bulbs, with some other perennials mixed in. have no idea what variety of Iris these are. A neighbor gave them to me many years ago. She had found next to an abandoned ginger ale bottling plant, so I call them the Ginger Ale Iris. They are a light yellow color so it seems to be an appropriate name.

 

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Where did these tulips come from? I didn’t plant them, they just suddenly appeared among my rose bushes. Must have been left by the previous owners, though that was 14 years ago!

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A hosta and some Tiger Lilies. In New England, if nothing else is going to grow somewhere, then plant some Tiger Lilies. Or just wait awhile and some will appear there anyway.

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Usually Spring for me has meant a trip to Blanchette Gardens in Carlisle, Massachusetts. This is where I bought all of my perennials. Unfortunately, the owners retired last year, so I’ll have to find somewhere else to go. I’ll miss going there as it was a relaxing place to browse through their rows of native perennials, most of them very hard to find elsewhere. They sold their plants by their Latin names, with small plastic tags attached to each pot. I would keep each tag once I transplanted them, thinking that I would somehow keep track of them. But have I ever done that, No. So here’s a row of my perennials, just about all are from Blanchette, many have been here as long as I have been living here. Do I know the names of any of them ? Nope, not a single one!

I still have those tags with the Latin names somewhere, I should try to match up the names to the plants. Yeah, I’m sure I’ll do that.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Street Life

Here’s some photos for this week’s photo challenge with the ‘Street Life’ theme.  There’s not a whole lot of vibrant street life here in southern New Hampshire, especially in late March, when the mud and snow are still piled up outside ready to be tracked into the house.

So it’s off to Italy we go!

Here’s Rome:

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And here’s Florence:

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And here’s Milan:

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WPC: Perspective

This week’s photo challenge is ‘Perspective’.

Here are some photos I took in Northern Arizona a few years ago that should fit.

Here’s a typical scene for the area, with a focus on the horizon.

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Same spot, but with a focus on the sky.

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The next set are from a hike we went on a few miles away.  While it looks lush, it was a very hot day.  The first shot takes in th entire scene, with the focus on the canyon and river.  I suppose my idea was to lead the viewer from the river, to the boulder, down the river into the canyon.

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In the next one, I placed the camera a little bit closer to the ground to get a better view of the boulder.

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The last one we look a little lower and see how I got to this spot and maybe realize how hot a day it was.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Abandoned

This week’s photo challenge is “Abandoned”, so here are a few photos of abandoned things we’ve found in our travels around New England.

On older farms you’re most likely going to find an old abandoned tractor.  Or maybe it’ll get fixed once the parts arrive at the store.

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If you look around in the forest long enough, you will also most likely find old stone walls.  Evidence of how the land was formerly used as a farm years ago.

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In the forest, you’ll also find empty nests is you look closely.   Looks like Mr. C has found an old woodpecker nest!

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This year’s vegetable garden

Mr. C started his own vegetable garden this weekend. He’s very excited to see what will happen with the seeds he planted. He planted the seeds in small starter pots with Ms. J, while I was off doing yet another home improvement project. So I don’t have a lot of detail on how they did it. Last year the only thing we were able to plant were some basil seeds. Once basil starts, it grows like a weed, so we had some home-made pesto meals in the Fall. Pesto is one of those things that are very expensive when you but it in the supermarket but turn out to be kind of easy to make at home. So instead of paying something like $6 a jar for one meal’s worth of pesto, we had about six pesto meals for about $2.

This year he planted basil, three types of tomatoes, Swiss chard, oregano, and dill. (Can you tell that I’m Italian from the selection of seeds?). He’s checking the seed tray every hour or so to see if any of the seeds are growing yet. I have no idea where we will put all of these plants in the backyard yet, but it’ll be fun for him to watch them grow.

I’ve never really been able to follow through on keeping track of a project like this for the blog, but here’s the first photo. It just looks like some dirt so far.

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